Thursday, December 13, 2012

Dept: Red tide detected in Sabah waters

Sabah Daily Express, 12 December 2012

Kota Kinabalu: The State Fisheries Department issued a red tide warning, Wednesday, advising the public to refrain immediately from consuming any type of shellfish or bivalves obtained from the sea.

This includes oysters (tiram), mussels (kupang), cockles (kerang) and any type of clam-like seafood.

Its Director, Rayner Stuel Galid (pic), said a year-long Red Tide Monitoring Programme conducted by the department, in collaboration with the State Health Department, has detected the presence of Paralytic Shell Fish Poisoning (PSP) toxins in samples of bivalves (kerang) from waters of certain parts of the State's west coast.

He said the samples taken from Kuala Penyu (particularly Sitompok Lake area) and from waters off Kota Kinabalu, including Gaya Island, Sepanggar Bay (including Kuala Menggatal) and Likas Bay, as well as Papar, Putatan and Tuaran districts have shown to contain toxic levels of PSP toxins.

Additionally, the department also detected the presence of high densities of the PSP-causative organism, that is the dinoflagellate, Pyrodinium bahamense var compressum, in samples of sea water from these areas.

The numbers become so large and dense that sometimes they impart a brownish-red colour to the sea. These findings are consistent with the results of analysis of toxic shellfish mentioned earlier, he added.

According to Rayner, the mouse bioassay, the method for analysis of PSP in shellfish by the department at its research centre in Likas, found some of the shellfish samples to have as high as 4,010 Mouse Units (MUs) (Papar) and 1,270MU (Tuaran), which are considered as very toxic.

Red tide occurrences in Sabah in the past years have revealed bivalves to be as toxic as 8,000MU. The lowest limit as the dangerous level for humans is 400MU.

"If consumers do wish to eat bivalve shellfish, they are advised to make sure these are not obtained from waters off the West Coast of Sabah," Rayner said.

While it is impossible to test every shellfish and fish from the sea for toxins, he said the department declared that this red tide is occurring in the areas mentioned above and there is a high possibility that other adjoining districts will be affected in future.

It is also expected that shellfish will become more toxic as these dinoflagellates become more numerous in the sea.

Paralytic shellfish poisoning is a marine biotoxin that is associated with certain types of algae blooms in coastal waters. Paralytic shellfish poisons are accumulated in shellfish which have filter-fed upon toxic one-celled microscopic algae called dinoflagellates, which occurs naturally as a part of the ocean plankton.

Eating toxic shellfish can cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans. PSP is caused by saxitoxin, which is produced by the dinoflagellate, Pyrodinium bahamanse (var. compressum) and is one of the most potent toxins known to scientists.

The first recorded PSP case in Sabah was in 1976 where 202 victims suffered and saw seven deaths. Since then PSP occurrences have been detected every few years off the West Coast.

Early symptoms of PSP include tingling of the lips and tongue, which may begin within minutes of eating poisonous shellfish or may take an hour or two to develop.

Depending on the amount of toxin a person has ingested, symptoms may progress to a sensation of "pricking of pins and needles" of the skin and then loss of control of arms and legs, followed by difficulty in breathing.

Some people have experienced a sense of floating or nausea, he said, adding if a person consumes enough poison, muscles of the chest and abdomen become paralysed.

He said death can result in as little as two hours, as muscles used for breathing become paralysed.

"If one experiences the above symptoms, get medical treatment immediately at the nearest hospital or clinic. There is no medication available for PSP or Saxitoxin poisoning; in general, supportive measures are the basis of treatment for PSP and in severe cases, with the use of a mechanical respirator and oxygen," Rayner said.

He said the types of sea life considered safe to eat include all types of prawns and crabs including shovel-nosed lobsters, mantis shrimps, all types of coral fishes and fishes which are predatory such as sharks and stingrays, barracuda, tenggeri, jacks, etc, and deepsea fishes.

However, as a prudent measure consumer they are advised to throw away the guts and gills of any fish to be eaten and these same fishes are to be washed properly.

Also, any type of dried, canned, bottled or salted fish products are safe.

The department is currently doing further sampling and testing on fishes and sea life collected from other districts to determine whether these are also toxic and dangerous to human health.

For further information visit website http://www.fishdept.sabah.gov.my/download/redtideinfo.doc

Source: http://www.dailyexpress.com.my/news.cfm?NewsID=83611

    

Friday, December 07, 2012

Phytoplankton bloom at Sulu Sea change the Blur Sea to Green Color

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group

Phytoplankton bloom at Sulu Sea end of Nov 2012

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


Sea Surface Temperature at Sulu Sea and Typhoon Bopha

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


Satellite image of Chlorophyll a at Sulu Sea and Typhoon Bopha

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


Chlorophyll a at Sulu Sea by Typhoon Bopha

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html

SDPSRTS A2012337062500.L2_LAC.Southern_Vietnam.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group

SDPSRTS A2012338053000.L2_LAC.N_Borneo.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


Wednesday, November 28, 2012

NASA GSFC position announcement

The Earth Sciences Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland is seeking qualified candidates for a career civil service position in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry research as the Chief of the Ocean Ecology Laboratory.  
 
In addition to supervisory functions, the successful candidate will serve as an expert consultant in planning, monitoring, and administering ocean ecology projects of national or international significance. Specifically, he or she will provide expertise and oversight for the development and testing of advanced ocean color sensors, e.g., the Ocean Radiometer for Carbon Assessment (ORCA) instrument; scientific expertise with respect to the Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on JPSS and ocean related areas of NASA's developing Carbon Monitoring system; serving as consultant and scientific lead for ocean color issues related to NASA's PACE mission and the ACE and GEOCAPE decadal survey missions; and providing leadership in the planning and collection of mission validation field data and associated campaigns.
 
 Candidates having experience with NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) and Decadal Survey Satellite Missions and familiarity with related research activities at the Earth Sciences Division-Ocean Ecology Laboratory (http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov) are highly desirable.  A Ph.D. degree or equivalent training and experience in ocean biological science or a related science discipline is preferred.
 
 This advertisement is intended to provide an opportunity for interested persons to have discussions with the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Division concerning NASA's goals and the candidate's interests. A subsequent job application process will be conducted using the USAJOBS application process (www.usajobs.gov <http://www.usajobs.gov> ). Interested candidates should respond by submitting their current vita including research interests via  <http://atmospheres.gsfc.nasa.gov/positions/form.php> email (David.Adamec@nasa.gov) by January 11, 2013. For additional questions, please contact Dr. David Adamec, Deputy Director for Hydrospheric and Biospheric Sciences, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center at the same email address. 
 
NASA, GSFC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
 

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

First International Ocean Colour Science (IOCS) Meeting

First International Ocean Colour Science (IOCS) Meeting

Registration is now open for the first International Ocean Colour Science meeting, which will take place in Darmstadt, Germany from 6-8 May 2013 (see the official website at http://iocs.ioccg.org).   The primary focus of the IOCS meeting is to build and strengthen the international ocean  colour community by providing a structure and mechanisms to collectively address common issues and goals.  The aim is to achieve the best quality ocean colour data that meet scientific, environmental, climate and operational needs through international collaboration and scientific and technological innovation.  In addition to providing a forum to develop a strong voice for the community, the meeting will also offer an opportunity to interact and collaborate with other ocean colour scientists. 

The symposium is convened by the International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG) in partnership with, and thanks to the generous sponsorship of NASA and EUMETSAT.  Other meeting sponsors include ESA and CNES which are gratefully acknowledged. 

The program has not yet been finalized but will include talks by space agency representatives on the status of existing missions, how and where to get the data, and information on future missions.  In addition there will be splinter sessions, panel discussions and talks by invited keynote speakers as well as comprehensive poster sessions to review the progress of scientific ocean colour research.  The meeting will close with a session on future directions and needs. We are now accepting proposals for splinter sessions in a number of topical areas. To submit a proposal for a splinter session please go to:  http://iocs.ioccg.org/program/splinter-sessions/.

Registration for the meeting is free, but all participants must be registered in order to attend.  Please forward this announcement to interested colleagues and/or circulate via mailing lists.  


Tuesday, October 30, 2012

SDPSRTS A2012283070000.L2_LAC.Eastern_Indian_Ocean.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group

SDPSRTS A2012301051000.L2_LAC.N_Borneo.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


SDPSRTS A2012301051000.L2_LAC.N_Borneo.sst.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


SDPSRTS A2012301065000.L2_LAC.Eastern_Indian_Ocean.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group

SDPSRTS A2012302073000.L2_LAC.Eastern_Indian_Ocean.chlor_a.png

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SeaWiFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


Tuesday, October 09, 2012

Flight Campaigns : Airborne Hyperspectral Imaging

To foster Imaging Spectroscopy (IS) expertise and the use of IS data in research activities, UPM Remote Sensing Research Group and UPM Consultancy & Services Sdn Bhd  will be organizing two hyperspectral data acquisition campaign with diverse airborne hyperspectral images and imaging spectrometers. The sensor that will be used in this campaign is AISA-Dual, a hyper-spectral airborne imager with a spectral range spanning 400-2450 nm.

 

First campaign experiment will be scheduled on December 2012 and focusing on the region of West Peninsular Malaysia. Second campaign experiment will be scheduled on January 2013 that focusing the region of Sabah and Sarawak.

 

Interested users need to provide minimum information about the study area (ROI in lat/long), features of interest, coincidence satellite overpass during the campaign is scheduled to accommodate the campaign operator. Requirement of minimum order is RM10,000.00 to allow the user benefited from the campaign.

 

 Interested users that would like to participate any campaigns as mentioned above, please don't be

hesitated to contact RS team for further information.

 

Prof. Dr. Shattri Mansor (shattri[at]eng.upm.edu.my)

Assoc. Prof. Lt. Col. (R) Mohamed Tarmizi Ahmad (tarmizi1[at]eng.upm.edu.my)

Mr. Zailani Khuzaimah (zailani[at]putra.upm.edu.my)

Dr Mohd Kamil Yusoff (mkamil.upmholdings[at]gmail.com)

 

Remote Sensing Research Group

Faculty of Engineering

Universiti Putra Malaysia





--
Best Regards,

CK Tan

Monday, July 30, 2012

Fwd: [ocean-color] Position open - phytoplankton physiologist/ecologist - USF

Dear colleagues:
 
 This position is still open and we welcome applications from top-notch young scientists who can address marine phytoplankton physiology/ecology (in a broad sense of the oceanographic discipline).
 
 [NOTE - THE DATES IN THE ANNOUNCEMENT REMAIN OPEN AND FLEXIBLE!! IGNORE THE DATES.]
 
 
 --------------------------------------------------
 
 https://employment.usf.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/position/JobDetails_css.jsp?postingId=180922
 
 

Posting Title:

Phytoplankton Physiologist/Ecologist  



 
Department Number/Name:

0-2500-000 College of Marine Science  

 
 
College/Division:

College of Marine Science  

 
 
Location of Position/Campus:

USF St. Petersburg  

 


 
Posting Button

Faculty  

 


 
Other Work Location



 


 
Salary Plan:

Faculty  

 


 
Hiring Salary/Salary Range:

Salary is negotiable and competitive.  
 

 

 The College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida invites applications for a tenure-track, nine-month academic faculty position. Appointment can be at the Assistant, Associate or Professor rank. Salary is negotiable and competitive.
 
 We seek a Phytoplankton Physiologist/Ecologist who will employ modern tools of multi-disciplinary science to understand phytoplankton-mediated processes at the base of the marine food web, ranging from measurements of photosynthetic and nutrient uptake rates to predator-prey interactions, both within laboratory cultures and at sea.  

 


 
Minimum Qualifications (Education & Experience):

Doctoral degree from an accredited institution or the highest degree appropriate in the field of specialization with a demonstrated record of achievement in teaching, academic research, and service. Normally will have produced creative work, professional writing or research in referred and other professional journals. Must meet university criteria for appointment to the rank of Assistant/Associate/Professor.  

 


 
Preferred Qualifications (Education & Experience):

This position requires a broadly based investigator with knowledge of phytoplankton species and ecology involving a primary research interest in phytoplankton physiology. Applicants should be capable of interacting with ongoing multi-disciplinary oceanographic programs. The successful candidate would be expected to contribute to core courses in oceanography and teach specialty courses in phytoplankton biology.
 
 
 
Additional Information for Applicants:

For the Assistant Professor rank, candidates must have a strong potential for scholarly publication and obtaining extramural research funding, and be committed to quality instruction and mentoring of graduate students.
 
 For the Associate Professor rank, candidates must also have an outstanding record in research, including a substantive publication record, evidence of success in attracting extramural research funding and a strong record in graduate education as evidenced by successful direction of master's and/or doctoral candidates.
 
 For the Professor rank, candidates must also have a record of high productivity in research throughout their careers, substantive contributions in professional service, and significant recognition by peers at the national and international levels.
 
 Please submit a cover letter stating qualifications. Please append research and teaching statements, curriculum vitae, and contact information for three referees. Position is open until filled, however, review of applications will begin immediately with preference given to those received by November 15, 2011. Appointment is expected to commence August 7, 2012.  [NOTE - THESE DATES REMAIN OPEN AND FLEXIBLE!! IGNORE THE DATES.]
 
  

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Postdoc Position Available

Two new postdoctoral research opportunities are available:

1) Postdoctoral Research Opportunity – Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing to Marine Ecosystem Based Management (NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Narragansett, RI, USA)

A postdoctoral research opportunity sponsored by the National Research Council is available at the NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Narragansett, RI. Our primary objective is to understand the long-term changes in primary productivity and how it relates to fisheries production and ecosystem based management in the northeast US, continental shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NESLME). The NESLME is a dynamic, highly productive, and intensively studied ecosystem supporting a constellation of ecosystem goods and services. This work is being conducted using time series of in situ, modeled, and satellite derived biological and physical data. These analyses will help provide a more holistic perspective in the development of an ecosystem approach to management for the NESLME.
nrc58.nas.edu/RAPLab10/Opportunity/Opportunity.aspx?LabCode=26&ROPCD=260355&RONum=B7587

Opportunities for the candidates are available for developing algorithms, techniques, and indices to monitor the phytoplankton community, and to investigate how changes in the climate and physical forcings affect primary production. The perspective applicant should have a strong background in oceanography, phytoplankton ecology, ecological modeling and/or ocean color remote sensing. Applicants will need to submit a description of previous research, references, transcripts and a research proposal through the NRC Research Associateship Program (http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/RAP).

The deadline for the summer review is August 1, 2012. 

Wednesday, May 02, 2012

Post-Doctoral Research Opportunity in Southern Ocean Bio-optics

Post-Doctoral Research Opportunity in Southern Ocean Bio-optics

 

Introduction

The Southern Ocean plays a very important role in the global carbon-climate system taking up an estimated ~50% of anthropogenic CO2. Ocean colour remote sensing is particularly useful in understanding chronically under-sampled marine environments (such as the polar oceans) and there is thus a need to develop and apply emerging techniques to derive information from ocean colour that will allow new insight into the Southern Ocean ecosystem function. The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observatory (SOCCO) is a multi-institutional South African initiative led by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) whose aims are to understand the link between climate and the carbon cycle in the Southern Ocean.

 

The marine bio-optical research group (comprised of the CSIR, SOCCO, the Earth Observation group and the University of Cape Town) currently has seven PhD students and two scientists working within a range of bio-optics fields that include the following: inland and coastal algorithm development, inherent optical property (IOP) characterisation with respect to phytoplankton assemblage and carbon content, phytoplankton functional type and harmful algal bloom algorithms, radiative transfer modelling, fluorescence quantum yield algorithms, and bio-optical/physiological modelling.

 

Equipment and Resources

The following equipment and resources are available to researchers within the group: New Agulhas II ice-breaking research vessel, Biospherical profiling C-OPS and Satlantic TSRB; IOP system comprised of Wetlabs AC-S, 2 x Wetlabs BB-9, Trios OSCAR, JFE MultiExcite spectral fluorometer; Coulter Multisizer 4; Four iRobot SeaGliders with Wetlabs PUK; Three NKE Provor Bio-optics floats including PIC and POC sensors; HPLC, microscopy etc. In addition the Hydrolight/Ecolight radiative transfer models and high performance computing facilities are available through the South African Centre for High Performance Computing (CHPC).

 

Expertise: The Post Doc candidate must have a PhD in the bio-optical field and extensive experience of acquiring and processing bio-optical data.

 

Job Description: To initiate further independent research within the strategic objectives of the current programme, assist with PhD/MSc supervision, assist with project management and further strategic development. The candidate must be willing to spend large periods of time at sea.

 

Potential Research Topics: The focus of the post doc is on improving understanding of algal dynamics and carbon sequestration in the Southern Ocean using bio-optical and ocean colour observations. There is some flexibility within this larger strategy e.g. fluorescence quantum yield and photo-physiological algorithms; bio-optically based radiative transfer and phytoplankton functional type algorithm development; integration of autonomous and ocean colour derived carbon dynamics; etc.

 

Money and Duration: The Post doc is for R200 000 (tax free) per year for two years extendable by one year subject to review. 

 

 

 

Institution: The post doc researcher will be based at the CHPC / CSIR and the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

 

Application Procedure: Applicants are requested to please send a CV with three referees to sthomalla@csir.co.za together with a motivational letter that highlights their training experience and includes a statement on their proposed research topic.


Wednesday, April 11, 2012

NASA Job Announcement

Job Title:  DIRECTOR, EARTH SCIENCE DIVISION - National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Job Announcement Number:HQ12S0012
  
SALARY RANGE:
 $119,554.00 to  $165,300.00 / Per Year  
  
OPEN PERIOD:
 Thursday, March 15, 2012 to Tuesday, May 08, 2012  
  
SERIES & GRADE:
 ES-1301-00  
  
POSITION INFORMATION:
 Full Time - Permanent  
  
DUTY LOCATIONS:
 1 vacancy(s) in the following locations: Washington DC Metro Area, DC
  
WHO MAY BE CONSIDERED:
 This announcement is open to All Qualified Individuals.   
  
JOB SUMMARY:

NASA is looking for exceptional leaders for the 21st century! If you are interested in leading dynamic organizations responsible for fulfilling or supporting exciting scientific and aeronautic missions, there may be a place for you on the team. Seize this opportunity to use your current skills, build  new ones, and make significant contributions to our nation's future. As an added benefit, you would be joining an agency ranked as one of the best places in the Federal government to work.
 

The Director, Earth Science Division (ESD), reports directly to the Associate Administrator, Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and supports the Associate Administrator in directing, determining and presenting the Earth Science Program to NASA senior management, the Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Congress and the science community.
 
DUTIES:

In partnership with other Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Division Directors, the Director, Earth Science Division, will support the Associate Administrator in providing the overall guidance, strategy, advocacy and budget formulation for NASA's Science Program and is responsible for the following:

--Provides overall guidance, direction, focus and executive leadership of NASA's Earth System science research program, its components, e.g., development and flight of research satellites and research aircraft; Earth science modeling, research and analysis programs, including management of both ground and space based components.
 
--Plans, coordinates and evaluates the full range of Earth Science Division programs and activities associated with flight and ground system development and operations, research, applications, education and outreach.

--Defends and represents the Earth Science Research Programs within NASA and to external entities such as the Office of Management and Budget and the Congress.

--Serves as liaison with the scientific community through advisory committees and other entities such as the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), coordinates the requirements for Earth science programs with the international community and other Federal agencies.

--Implements and manages approved programs within available funding and manpower resources at NASA centers, academic and research institutions, industry and with international partners.
 
The incumbent is responsible for furthering the goals of equal employment opportunity and diversity by taking positive steps to support the accomplishment of affirmative action objectives and by adhering to nondiscriminatory employment practices in all areas under his/her supervision.
 
For more information:  http://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/311936900

 

Friday, April 06, 2012

Postdoctoral Research Opportunity ­ Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing to Marine Ecosystem Based Management

Postdoctoral Research Opportunity – Applications of Satellite Remote Sensing to Marine Ecosystem Based Management

 
A postdoctoral research opportunity sponsored by the National Research Council is available at the NOAA/NMFS Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Narragansett, RI.  
Our primary objective is to understand the long-term changes in primary productivity and how it relates to fisheries production and ecosystem based management in the northeast US, continental shelf Large Marine Ecosystem (NESLME). The NESLME is a dynamic, highly productive, and intensively studied ecosystem supporting a constellation of ecosystem goods and services. This work is being conducted using time series of in situ, modeled, and satellite derived biological and physical data.  These analyses will help provide a more holistic perspective in the development of an ecosystem approach to management for the NESLME.

http://nrc58.nas.edu/RAPLab10/Opportunity/Opportunity.aspx?LabCode=26&ROPCD=260355&RONum=B7587 <http://nrc58.nas.edu/RAPLab10/Opportunity/Opportunity.aspx?LabCode=26&ROPCD=260355&RONum=B7587>

 

Opportunities for the candidates are available for developing algorithms, techniques, and indices to monitor the phytoplankton community, and to investigate how changes in the climate and physical forcings affect primary production. The perspective applicant should have a strong background in oceanography, phytoplankton ecology, ecological modeling and/or ocean color remote sensing.

 

To apply and for more information about the NRC Research Associateship Programs visit, http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/RAP/ <http://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/RAP/>

The deadline for the spring review is May 1, 2012.

 

Questions about this specific opportunity should be directed to:

Kimberly Hyde, Ph.D.

kimberly.hyde@noaa.gov <mailto:kimberly.hyde@noaa.gov>

http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/ecosys/ <http://www.nefsc.noaa.gov/ecosys/>


Wednesday, March 28, 2012

International Workshop on COASTAL OBSERVING AND FORECASTING SYSTEMS

COASTAL OBSERVING AND FORECASTING SYSTEMS, TODAY & TOMORROW
Livorno, Italy
April 18 – 19, 2012

This international workshop is focused on reviewing existing systems for
control and forecast of marine coastal areas, and it is dedicated to
observational systems, operational coastal hydrodynamic and
biogeochemical modeling, integrated systems and coastal observatories,
and applications of integrated systems.
The workshop is organized by LaMMA Consortium within the EU funded MOMAR
project - "Integrated system for monitoring and control of the marine
environment", aimed to create a common path of marine and coastal
monitoring between Sardinia, Tuscany and Corsica.
The present monitoring procedures, especially as regards the Tuscan
Archipelago, need to be upgraded, as shown by recent events such as the
issues related to the sinking of the Costa Concordia at the Isola del
Giglio.

The workshop information, program and registration details can be found
at the website: http://www.lamma.rete.toscana.it/news/workshop-momar

For more information please contact: workshopmomar@lamma.rete.toscana.it


Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Earth System Governance Tokyo 28-31 January 2013 Call for Papers


UNITED NATIONS UNIVERSITY HEAD QUARTERS
TOKYO, 28-31 JANUARY 2013

We invite you to the Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference, to be held 28-31 January 2013 at the United Nations University Headquarters in Tokyo, Japan. This event is part of the global conference series organized by the Earth System Governance Project, a ten-year research programme under the auspices of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP). This conference will be the fourth in a global series organized by the Earth System Governance Project. The Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference will be jointly hosted by the United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies (UNU-IAS), the International Environmental Governance Architecture Research Group and the Tokyo Institute of Technology on behalf of the Earth System Governance Project.

Key Dates
•       Deadline for paper abstracts: 1 July 2012
•       Notification of acceptance: 1 September 2012
•       Full papers due: 1 December 2012
•       Conference date: 28-31 January 2013

Conference Themes
Today, a multitude of agents plays a significant role in earth system governance, ranging from traditional state actors to international organizations, civil society organizations, science networks, city coalitions, or business associations. At the same time, the overall governance architecture, from local to global levels, is becoming more complex as a consequence of ever increasing needs for governance and policy-development. This situation poses fundamental questions about the impacts of fragmented and complex governance architectures, the overall effectiveness of earth system governance, and the ways in which multiple agents at all levels influence related processes.

This complex architecture with multiple agents is the core research problem to be discussed at the Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference. The conference will bring together scholars from a wide range of disciplines as well as practitioners from diverse backgrounds to address the nexus between the analytical problems of agency and architecture in earth system governance, and will also consider the other analytical problems identified in the Earth System Governance Science and Implementation Plan. The timing of the Tokyo Conference, half a year after the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development ("Rio+20"), will make these discussions especially pertinent and timely. The conference may open up new and fruitful areas of science-policy interaction and strengthen the interface between science and policy in earth system governance.

We invite papers on six interrelated clusters of questions:

1. Earth System Governance Architectures in the 21st Century: The need for reform of the global institutional architecture for environmental and sustainable development governance has been discussed for many years, yet little progress in the political realm has been made so far. While some propose, for example, the creation of a world environment organization, others argue in favour of more decentralized architectures that try to configure multiple actors effectively. We invite papers that address various aspects of the basic design of the architecture of earth system governance. This includes papers that analyse advantages of centralized or decentralized governance architectures, multi-level governance, or governance and vision in the post-MDGs (Millennium Development Goals) era. Also important here is an investigation of the existing architecture and of the roles of various actors and actor networks in governance.

2. Climate and Energy Governance Architectures: Discussions about the advantages and disadvantages of various governance architectures have been particularly lively and fruitful in the area of climate and energy policy. A nuclear disaster in the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan highlighted even more the importance of effective and accountable governance in this domain at all levels. We thus invite papers that explore options for more effective architectures of future climate and energy governance. Papers could address, for example, effective multilevel governance architectures in the nexus between climate and energy security, or the optimal mechanisms to facilitate low carbon technology transfer, or the kind of partnerships that could combine actors of different scales and within and among different regions. Also important is how to fill the policy, implementation and financial gaps in designing the next generation of climate governance architectures.

3. The Nexus between Architecture and the other "A's" in Earth System Governance: One of the most important research questions in the area of earth system governance is the intersection between architecture and the other four analytical problems (the "5 A's") identified in the Earth System Governance Science and Implementation Plan. Hence, we invite papers that explore these linkages and interactions. For instance, how can equity and fairness concerns ('Allocation and Access') be addressed in the design and implementation of environmental and development institutions? In what ways can private actors ('Agency') be held accountable ('Accountability') in environmental governance architectures?  What types of resource re-distribution and social conflicts are created ('Allocation and Access') by different ways of structuring efforts ('Architecture') to enhance the resilience of social-ecological systems ('Adaptiveness')?

4. Political Dynamics in the Interface of Agency and Architecture: How can we recognize emerging agents in earth system governance? For example, how does increasing power of the major emerging economies change the political dynamics and thereby influence the overall governance architecture? What would be the role of regional integration? How to avoid politicization of science bodies, while ensuring political influence? We invite here papers that explore political dynamics of earth system governance in the interface of agency and architecture.

5. Methodological Challenges to Complex Architectures and Multiple Agents: Earth system governance research requires new and emerging technology developments as well as collaboration between social sciences, natural sciences and engineering. We thus also invite papers that utilize innovative technology and methodology in analysing problems related to complexity. They may include, for example, new approaches and findings in the application of agent-based modelling, GIS, socio-economic modelling, or more philosophical approaches and further development of the philosophy of science and the role of post-normal science approaches etc.

6. Special Conference Stream on Nuclear Safety and Post-disaster Governance: Nuclear disaster in the aftermath of the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan posed many governance questions. How should nuclear be governed? What lessons could we learn from the evacuation process? What is the role of science in the face of emergency? What are the causal relationships between energy governance in Japan, which are centred on strong energy companies, and the effectiveness of the response to the nuclear disaster that began in March 2011? There will be a special conference stream devoted for the issues highlighting nuclear and disaster.

* Background:
The challenge of establishing effective strategies for mediating the relationship between humans and the natural world represents one of the most daunting tasks in the quest for environmental sustainability at all levels, from the local to the global. Environmental problems, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, water quality and access problems, soil erosion and others, call into question the fundamental viability of how humans have organized the relationship between society and nature. There is an urgent need to identify and develop new strategies for steering societies towards a more sustainable relationship with the natural world.

The Earth System Governance Project was launched in 2009 to address these problems of environmental governance. In this project, "earth system governance" is defined as the interrelated system of formal and informal rules, rule-making mechanisms and actor-networks at all levels of human society (from local to global) that are set up to steer societies towards preventing, mitigating, and adapting to global and local environmental change and earth system transformation, within the normative context of sustainable development. The Earth System Governance Project's Science Plan (available at http://www.earthsystemgovernance.org) is organized around five analytical problems. Architecture relates to the emergence, design and effectiveness of governance arrangements. Agency addresses questions of who governs the earth system and how. Adaptiveness research explores the ability of governance systems to change in the face of new knowledge and challenges as well as to enhance adaptiveness of social-ecological systems in the face of major disturbances. Accountability refers to the democratic quality of environmental governance arrangements. Finally, allocation and access deal with justice, equity, and fairness. These analytical problems are united by the cross-cutting themes of power, knowledge, norms and scale.

The Earth System Governance Project is a core project of the International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change (IHDP) under the auspices of the International Social Science Council (ISSC), the International Council for Science (ICSU), and the United Nations University (UNU).

* Abstract Submission:
We invite abstracts on one of these six conference themes from scholars in the social and natural sciences, as well as practitioners, from the global South and North. Abstracts must be submitted electronically through the conference website http://tokyo2013.earthsystemgovernance.org by 1 July 2012 and may not exceed 300 words. All abstracts will be evaluated in double-blind peer-review by several members of the conference review panel. For additional information on the Earth System Governance Project, including its Science and Implementation Plan, please visit www.earthsystemgovernance.org.

* Hosts


International Human Dimensions Programme on Global Environmental Change Earth System Governance Project

United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies

International Environmental Governance Architecture Research Group

* Co-hosts and Sponsors


The Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP)

Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES)

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Institut du Développement Durable et des Relations Internationals (IDDRI)

L'Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR)

Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST)

* International Steering Committee
•       Prof. Steinar Andresen, Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway
•       Prof. Frank Biermann, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
•       Dr. Karin Bäckstrand, Lund University, Sweden
•       Prof. Michele M. Betsill, Colorado State University, United States of America
•       Prof. Susana Camargo Vieira, Universidade de Itaúna, Brazil
•       Dr. Mark Elder, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Japan
•       Prof. Joyeeta Gupta, UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education, and VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands
•       Prof. Peter M. Haas, University of Massachusetts Amherst, United States of America
•       Prof. Hironori Hamanaka, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Japan
•       Dr. Yasuko Kameyama, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan
•       Prof. Norichika Kanie, Tokyo Institute of Technology, and United Nations University Institute of Advanced Studies, Japan
•       Dr. Louis Lebel, Unit for Social and Environmental Research, Chiang Mai University, Thailand
•       Prof. Diana Liverman, University of Arizona, and Oxford University, United States of America
•       Prof. Shunji Matsuoka, Waseda University, Tokyo Japan
•       Prof. Isao Sakaguchi, Gakushuin University, Japan
•       Dr. Heike Schroeder, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom
•       Prof. Bernd Siebenhüner, Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg, Germany
•       Dr. Laurence Tubiana, Institut du Développement Durable et des Relations Internationales (IDDRI), France
•       Prof. Kazuhiro Ueta, Kyoto University, Japan
•       Prof. Takahiro Yamada, Tokyo Metropolitian University
•       Prof. Oran R. Young, University of California at Santa Barbara, United States of America

* Lead Faculty, Earth System Governance Project
•       Prof. Arun Agrawal, University of Michigan, United States of America
•       Prof. Steinar Andresen, Fridtjof Nansen Institute, Norway
•       Prof. Ken Conca, American University, United States of America
•       Prof. Leila da Costa Ferreira, University of Campinas, Brazil
•       Prof. Bharat H. Desai, Jawaharlal Nehru University, India
•       Prof. John S. Dryzek, Australian National University, Australia
•       Prof. Carl Folke, Stockholm University, and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden
•       Prof. Roberto P. Guimarães, Getulio Vargas Foundation, and State University of Campinas, Brazil
•       Prof. Peter M. Haas, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, United States of America
•       Prof. Hironori Hamanaka, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies, Japan
•       Prof. Jia Wenhua, China University of Political Science and Law, China
•       Prof. Andrew Jordan, University of East Anglia, United Kingdom
•       Dr. Tatiana Kluvánková-Oravská, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovakia
•       Prof. Ma Zhong, Renmin University of China, China
•       Dr. Elizabeth L. Malone, Joint Global Change Research Institute, United States of America
•       Prof. James Meadowcroft, Carleton University, Canada
•       Prof. Ronald B. Mitchell, University of Oregon, United States of America
•       Prof. Peter Newell, University Sussex, United Kingdom
•       Prof. Sebastian Oberthür, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
•       Prof. Hiroshi Ohta, Waseda University, Japan
•       Prof. Lennart Olsson, Lund University, Sweden
•       Prof. Arthur Petersen, VU University Amsterdam; and PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, The Netherlands
•       Prof. Qi Ye, Tsinghua University, China
•       Dr. R.B. Singh, University of Delhi, India
•       Prof. Will Steffen, Australian National University, Australia
•       Prof. Simon Tay, National University of Singapore, Singapore
•       Dr. Laurance Tubiana, Institut du Développement Durable et des Relations Internationales (IDDRI), France
•       Prof. Kazuhiro Ueta, Kyoto University, Japan
•       Prof. Arild Underdal, University of Oslo, Norway
•       Prof. Eduardo Viola, University of Brasilia, Brazil
•       Prof. Wang Canfa, China University of Political Science and Law, China
•       Prof. Oran R. Young, University of California at Santa Barbara, United States of America

* Funding Support:
We are trying our best to secure some funding to be available to support conference participation by early–career colleagues and those from developing countries. More information will be made available on the conference website.

For additional information on the Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference, please e-mail us here:
TokyoESG2013@ias.unu.edu

We look forward to welcoming you to the first Earth System Governance conference in Asia!

On behalf of all organizers, sponsors, and co-hosts,
Norichika KANIE
kanie@valdes.titech.ac.jp
Chair, 2013 Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference

Erin Kennedy
TokyoESG2013@ias.unu.edu
Conference Manager, 2013 Earth System Governance Tokyo Conference



--
Best Regards,

CK Tan

Post Doctoral Researcher Position in Ocean Color Remote Sensing

Post Doctoral Researcher Position in Ocean Color Remote Sensing

The ocean color research group within the Earth Observation and Environmental Remote Sensing Lab at Masdar institute is looking for a postdoctoral researcher in the field of coastal ocean color research and applications in turbid atmosphere. We are seeking an outstanding scientist to develop improved ocean color products from the current and future ocean color satellite sensors including SeaWiFS, MODIS, VIIRS and MERIS. The successful candidate will be based at Masdar Institute, Abu Dhabi (UAE).
The individual in this position will work on satellite data from various ocean color satellite sensors and field measurements from ocean and atmosphere to develop, validate, and evaluate algorithms for the remote retrieval of the ocean color and atmospheric products. Strong programming skills are required and demonstrated ability to develop and improve algorithms for ocean color and aerosol products.
Masdar Institute of Science and Technology (
www.masdar.ac.ae) is the world's first graduate-level university dedicated to providing real-world solutions to issues of sustainability. The Institute's goal is to become a world-class research-driven graduate-level university, focusing on advanced energy and sustainable technologies. The Institute, which was created in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), integrates theory and practice to incubate a culture of innovation and entrepreneurship, working to develop the critical thinkers and leaders of tomorrow. Masdar Institute is situated in Masdar City (www.masdar.ae), an emerging global clean-technology cluster that aims to be one of the world's most sustainable urban developments, powered by renewable energy and providing students and researchers with a unique opportunity to live and learn in a true "living laboratory" environment.
Position Requirements
- PhD in remote sensing, oceanography or a related discipline preferably with some postdoctoral experience.
- Experience in analyzing data from various satellite sensors, e.g., SeaWiFS, MERIS, MODIS, etc. -  Experience in advanced processing regional ocean color data using SeaDAS, ENVI-IDL, Matlab and/or other data processing software packages.
- Experience in evaluating and recalibrating ocean color algorithms using in situ measurements.
- Experience in evaluating aerosol retrievals and developing aerosol retrieval algorithm.
- Appropriate skills in batch processing large data sets and satellite database management.
- Hands-on experience in using ESRI software ArcGIS Desktop and ability to integrate imagery with other GIS data.
- Demonstrated ability to publish research findings in peer reviewed journals.
- Excellent communication skills in English scientific writing/publishing and presentation.

The compensation package for this position is very competitive with a tax-exempt net salary ranging between US$ 70k and US$ 90k. Additional benefits include: annual two-way airfare to home country, one-time moving allowance, free comprehensive international medical coverage, professional memberships, conference attendance expenses and other components.
The application package should include:
- A cover letter summarizing experience and motivation for this position.
-   Curriculum Vitae including a list of publications.
- Sample of relevant published research papers.
- A list of 3 potential referees.

Applications should be submitted by email to
Dr. Hosni Ghedira (hghedira@mit.edu). Review of applications will begin on February 15 2012 and continue until the position is filled. The expected starting date is March 15, 2012.
While we thank all applicants for their interest, only those under consideration will be contacted for a follow-up interview.

Monday, February 13, 2012

SDPSRTS A2012041071500.L2_LAC.Eastern_Indian_Ocean.chlor_a.png

High chlorophyll a water extended from Langkawi into the Andaman Sea

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS). 

There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEAWIFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


SDPSRTS A2012042075500.L2_LAC.Eastern_Indian_Ocean.chlor_a.png

The attached MODIS-Aqua image(s) were generated by the automated Ocean-Color Data
Processing System (ODPS).  

 There is a color bar legend on the Ocean Color Home Page if you chose not to
have the color bar appended to the image:

http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov/SEAWIFS/HTML/colorbars.html


Regards from the Ocean Biology Processing Group


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